How Patient-Partners are involved

There are two ways to be actively involved:

1) Join a Patient Circle.
You will participate in discussions about once a month pertaining to strategic goals and orientations of the Network.

2) Get involved in a research team
. Researchers need your feedback to make sure research projects are relevant for people living with diabetes.

What can you expect when you become a Patient Partner of the network?

  • Support: You will have support and flexibility to ensure you can contribute fully to discussions and decisions. You will experience a safe environment that promotes honest interactions, cultural competence, training and education. You will be compensated financially for your involvement.
  • Inclusiveness: Your engagement in research integrates a diversity of patient perspectives and research will be reflective of your contribution.
  • Mutual respect: Your expertise will be acknowledged and valued as experiential knowledge by researchers and practitioners.
  • Co-Build: You will work with researchers and practitioners from the beginning to identify problems and gaps, set priorities for research and work together to produce and implement solutions.
  • Core competencies: You will develop core competencies while contributing to successful patient-oriented research.

What are Patient Circles?

Patient Circles are composed of a diverse group of people affected by diabetes from across Canada. Patient Circle members will either have diabetes themselves or will be caregivers for a person with diabetes.
There are three (3) Patient Circles:

  1. The General Patient Circle (10-15 people) aims to have an approximately equal representation from people whose lives are affected by type 1 and type 2 diabetes.   People affected by other types of diabetes are also welcome to participate.
  2. The Francophone Patient Circle (6-8 people) aims to have an equal representation from people whose lives are affected by type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
  3. The Indigenous Patient Advisory Circle (8-15 people) aims to have an equal representation from people whose lives are affected by type 1 and type 2 diabetes.


What does it mean to be part of the General Patient Circle?

Members of the General Patient Circle (10-15 people) will meet approximately 8 times per year to discuss strategic goals of the Circles. There will be at least one in-person meeting, and the other meetings will be by telephone or another method suitable for everyone (to be discussed among members). The meetings will last about 90 minutes and will be in English.

What does it mean to be part of the Francophone Patient Circle?

Members of the Francophone Patient Circle (6-8 people) will meet approximately 4 times per year to discuss goals and issues specific to this Circle. There will be at least one in-person meeting, and the other meetings will be by telephone or another method suitable for everyone (to be discussed among members). The meetings will last about 90 minutes and will be in French.

What does it mean to be part of the Indigenous Patient Circle?

Members of the Indigenous Patient Circle (6-8 people) will meet approximately 4 times per year to discuss goals and issues specific to this Circle. There will be at least one in-person meeting, and the other meetings will be by telephone or another method suitable for everyone (to be discussed among members). The meetings will last around 90 minutes and the language of communication will be determined among members once the Circle is fully assembled.

How will the Patient Circles connect with each other?

Two (2) members from each of the Francophone and Indigenous Circles will also be members of the General Patient Circle (4 members in total who will be part of the 10-15 members). These designated patients will represent the interests of their respective circles as well as liaise between the General Patient Circle and their specific Circles.

What will be required of the liaisons?

The liaisons will attend more meetings because they will attend both General Patient Circle meetings and their designated specific Patient Circle meetings.
For example: If a Patient Partner is a liaison for the Francophone Patient Circle, then they will attend a total of 12 meetings (8 General Patient Circle meetings + 4 Francophone Patient Circle meetings).

Are Patient Partners compensated?

Yes. In recognition for their time spent and valuable expertise, members of the Patient Circles will be compensated for their participation and contribution